Skip navigation


Self-Paced Online Courses at UCO



Self-Paced Online Courses (SPOC) at UCO are online correspondence courses students can complete at a flexible pace. You receive the same high-quality learning experience as found in all UCO courses in a format that matches your needs.

In self-paced online courses, you work independently under the supervision of a UCO professor and submit coursework at your own pace. You will use UCO's Learning Management System (LMS) to study course materials, ask questions, submit assignments, or check your grades.

Many self-paced online courses can be completed in as little as 4 weeks with all courses lasting no longer than 8 weeks; however, the time it takes to complete the course is dependent on many factors such as grading timelines, university holidays, and course-specific requirements and activities.


Benefits of SPOC



Learn Wherever you want

Unlike residential courses, SPOC allows students to enroll in college level-courses from anywhere as long as a reliable internet connection is present. This makes SPOC courses ideal for adult learners whose careers require frequent travel. They are also ideal for members of the military on deployment out-of-state and overseas.


LEARN WHENEVER YOU WANT

SPOC courses begin every two weeks throughout the regular Fall, Spring, and Summer terms. As such, you can begin a SPOC course before the term begins or anytime until the final six weeks of each semester.


Earn university credit

SPOC courses are credit-earning courses at the University of Central Oklahoma for admitted students. Prior to enrollment, visiting students wishing to take a SPOC course at UCO should check with their home institution to ensure the credits will be accepted upon transfer.



Is SPOC For You?


The burden of success, and learning, is placed on the student in SPOC courses. As such, they are not ideal for all students. Students that excel in SPOC courses tend to:

  • To be self-directed learners
  • Manage their time effectively
  • Immediately begin working and avoid procrastination
  • Finish early

In fact, as you can see below from the list of behaviors that impact success in SPOC courses, students that complete their courses ahead of the 8 week deadline have a higher success rate (earning a letter grade of A, B, or C) than students that procrastinate or work sporadicallly.



Schedule


SPOC courses are offered in a block format with the majority of blocks lasting eight (8) weeks in length. Some of the blocks may be condensed to seven (7) or six (6) weeks toward the end of each semester to allow students an opportunity to add an additional course beyond the last day to drop a course during the regular term. Click on the term and then the your preferred block below to see our available courses, including a course description and requirements.






Fall 2017 - SPOC Block 6



Enrollment Start Date 10/16/2017
Enrollment End Date 12/8/2017
Refund Deadline 10/22/2017
Withdrawal Deadline 11/23/2017


FIN 2313 - Personal Finance 18545 A survey of the field of personal financial management with major emphasis on problems of budgeting, insurance, bank services, credit usage, and investing.
FIN 3413 - Real Estate Principles 18524 Methods and practices of operating real estate agencies; conveyance of title, leases, mortgages, liens, contracts to buy or sell; methods of financing; zoning laws, subdividing, developing, agency management; appraisal practices.
FIN 3423 - Real Estate Practice 18527 Continuation of real estate principles with emphasis on practical and operational problems of the broker. Among topics covered will be listings, advertising, sales training, property valuation, property management, office management and closings. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3413.
FIN 3473 - Real Property Management N/A Developing, executing and evaluating comprehensive plans for the management of various kinds of real estate including: office buildings, industrial properties, hotels, store property, conventional housing; handling tenant credit and collections; dealing with maintenance problems; maintaining records and accounting.
FIN 3603 - Financial Statement Analysis 18530 Techniques and principles in the detailed analysis of accounting statements from the viewpoint of lenders, investors, or the financial managers of the firm. Not open to accounting majors. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3563.
MATH 1593 - Plane Trigonometry 18533 The course content focuses on trigonometric functions, equations and identities. Students will also learn solutions of triangles and the trigonometric representation of complex numbers. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or (MATH 1533 or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1533) or appropriate placement score
STAT 2103 - Intro Statistics for Sciences 18521 This course is an introduction to statistical methods with an emphasis on scientific applications. Students will be exposed to descriptive statistics, probability, estimation methods, hypothesis testing, linear regression, and correlation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or high school Algebra II with a minimum grade of “C”.

Fall 2017 - SPOC Block 7



Enrollment Start Date 10/23/2017
Enrollment End Date 12/8/2017
Refund Deadline 10/27/2017
Withdrawal Deadline 11/25/2017


FIN 2313 - Personal Finance 18546 A survey of the field of personal financial management with major emphasis on problems of budgeting, insurance, bank services, credit usage, and investing.
FIN 3413 - Real Estate Principles 18525 Methods and practices of operating real estate agencies; conveyance of title, leases, mortgages, liens, contracts to buy or sell; methods of financing; zoning laws, subdividing, developing, agency management; appraisal practices.
FIN 3423 - Real Estate Practice 18528 Continuation of real estate principles with emphasis on practical and operational problems of the broker. Among topics covered will be listings, advertising, sales training, property valuation, property management, office management and closings. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3413.
FIN 3473 - Real Property Management N/A Developing, executing and evaluating comprehensive plans for the management of various kinds of real estate including: office buildings, industrial properties, hotels, store property, conventional housing; handling tenant credit and collections; dealing with maintenance problems; maintaining records and accounting.
FIN 3603 - Financial Statement Analysis 18531 Techniques and principles in the detailed analysis of accounting statements from the viewpoint of lenders, investors, or the financial managers of the firm. Not open to accounting majors. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3563.
MATH 1593 - Plane Trigonometry 18534 The course content focuses on trigonometric functions, equations and identities. Students will also learn solutions of triangles and the trigonometric representation of complex numbers. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or (MATH 1533 or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1533) or appropriate placement score
MATH 2053 - Math Analysis for Business 18553 This course explores the mechanics underlying differential and integral calculus, as well as, their applications to business. It primarily focuses on single variable functions, but it will also introduce multivariable functions. This course is designed to equip business students with the tools to solve problems involving limits, differentiation, interpretations of the derivative, antiderivatives, indefinite and definite integrals, and partial differentiation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1453 or MATH 1513 or MATH 1533 or High School Algebra II all with a minimum grade of “C” or appropriate placement score.
STAT 2103 - Intro Statistics for Sciences 18522 This course is an introduction to statistical methods with an emphasis on scientific applications. Students will be exposed to descriptive statistics, probability, estimation methods, hypothesis testing, linear regression, and correlation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or high school Algebra II with a minimum grade of “C”.

Fall 2017 - SPOC Block 8



Enrollment Start Date 10/30/2017
Enrollment End Date 12/8/2017
Refund Deadline 11/3/2017
Withdrawal Deadline 11/27/2017


FIN 2313 - Personal Finance 18547 A survey of the field of personal financial management with major emphasis on problems of budgeting, insurance, bank services, credit usage, and investing.
FIN 3413 - Real Estate Principles 18526 Methods and practices of operating real estate agencies; conveyance of title, leases, mortgages, liens, contracts to buy or sell; methods of financing; zoning laws, subdividing, developing, agency management; appraisal practices.
FIN 3423 - Real Estate Practice 18529 Continuation of real estate principles with emphasis on practical and operational problems of the broker. Among topics covered will be listings, advertising, sales training, property valuation, property management, office management and closings. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3413.
FIN 3473 - Real Property Management N/A Developing, executing and evaluating comprehensive plans for the management of various kinds of real estate including: office buildings, industrial properties, hotels, store property, conventional housing; handling tenant credit and collections; dealing with maintenance problems; maintaining records and accounting.
FIN 3603 - Financial Statement Analysis 18532 Techniques and principles in the detailed analysis of accounting statements from the viewpoint of lenders, investors, or the financial managers of the firm. Not open to accounting majors. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3563.
MATH 1593 - Plane Trigonometry 18535 The course content focuses on trigonometric functions, equations and identities. Students will also learn solutions of triangles and the trigonometric representation of complex numbers. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or (MATH 1533 or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1533) or appropriate placement score
MATH 2053 - Math Analysis for Business 18554 This course explores the mechanics underlying differential and integral calculus, as well as, their applications to business. It primarily focuses on single variable functions, but it will also introduce multivariable functions. This course is designed to equip business students with the tools to solve problems involving limits, differentiation, interpretations of the derivative, antiderivatives, indefinite and definite integrals, and partial differentiation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1453 or MATH 1513 or MATH 1533 or High School Algebra II all with a minimum grade of “C” or appropriate placement score.
STAT 2103 - Intro Statistics for Sciences 18523 This course is an introduction to statistical methods with an emphasis on scientific applications. Students will be exposed to descriptive statistics, probability, estimation methods, hypothesis testing, linear regression, and correlation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or high school Algebra II with a minimum grade of “C”.

Spring 2018 - SPOC Block 1



Enrollment Start Date 12/18/2017
Enrollment End Date 2/9/2018
Refund Deadline 12/24/2017
Withdrawal Deadline 1/25/2018


BIO 1114 - General Biology 27814 This is an introduction to the life sciences as a course to fulfill the general education requirement for non-biology majors. The topics include an introduction to the fundamental principles of biology, the scientific method, cell structure and organization, biological molecules and metabolism, the levels of biological organization and systematics, plant and animal systems, Mendelian genetics, heredity, evolution and ecology. This course does not have an accompanying laboratory session and does not count towards a B.S. degree in Biology. A student will not receive credit for having taken both BIO 1114 and BIO 1214.
ESFR 5413 - Foundations of Gifted ED 27723 The purpose of this course is to introduce concepts and techniques for providing differentiated educational strategies for gifted and talented students. The historical and cultural foundation of gifted education programs provides a framework to examine different types of current-day gifted education programs, characteristics and identification procedures of gifted students, and gifted education theory and pedagogy. In addition, this course examines relevant state and federal polices related to gifted and talented education.
ESFR 5423 - Social Emotional Needs of the Gifted 27729 Understanding the social emotional needs of gifted learners is a complex and multifaceted study. This course is designed to create awareness and advocacy for educators and parents working with gifted students. An overview of the social and emotional issues surrounding gifted students offers participants in- depth exploration into the affective education needed to guide gifted youth. Participants will also develop a working knowledge of the influence of culture, family, friendships, expectations, gender, and self and societal pressures on gifted students and their identity.
ESFR 5453 - Leadership for Gifted ED 27736 This course examines how laws and public policy impact leadership in gifted education. Foundational knowledge and leadership skills required to implement communication, collaboration, and consultation in multiple areas of gifted education, as aligned to national, state, and local standards, and to evidence- based and most current best practice in gifted education, will be the main areas of focus in this course. Prerequisite(s): ESFR 5413 and 5433 and graduate standing.
FIN 2313 - Personal Finance 27774 A survey of the field of personal financial management with major emphasis on problems of budgeting, insurance, bank services, credit usage, and investing.
FIN 3413 - Real Estate Principles 27775 Methods and practices of operating real estate agencies; conveyance of title, leases, mortgages, liens, contracts to buy or sell; methods of financing; zoning laws, subdividing, developing, agency management; appraisal practices.
FIN 3423 - Real Estate Practice 27776 Continuation of real estate principles with emphasis on practical and operational problems of the broker. Among topics covered will be listings, advertising, sales training, property valuation, property management, office management and closings. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3413.
FIN 3473 - Real Property Management 27744 Developing, executing and evaluating comprehensive plans for the management of various kinds of real estate including: office buildings, industrial properties, hotels, store property, conventional housing; handling tenant credit and collections; dealing with maintenance problems; maintaining records and accounting.
FIN 3603 - Financial Statement Analysis 27780 Techniques and principles in the detailed analysis of accounting statements from the viewpoint of lenders, investors, or the financial managers of the firm. Not open to accounting majors. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3563.
GEO 2303 - Regional Geo Of The World TBA A study of the world’s major regions. Each region’s physical, cultural, and politico-economic characteristics are reviewed. Region-wide cooperation patterns are discussed and compared. Most major countries in the region are introduced with emphasis on related current issues.
HIST 1483 - History Of U.S. to 1877 TBA US History to 1877 is a survey of US history from the colonial period through the Civil War.
MATH 1513 - College Algebra 27828 This course is an overview of algebraic topics used in real world applications. Topics include complex numbers, variation, solving equations and inequalities, properties and the algebra of functions, graphing basic functions and their transformations, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, as well as modeling and real world applications. This course also serves as a preparatory course for Bio-Calculus and Mathematical Analysis for Business. Credit may be earned in only one course from MATH 1453 or MATH 1513.
MATH 1593 - Plane Trigonometry 27777 The course content focuses on trigonometric functions, equations and identities. Students will also learn solutions of triangles and the trigonometric representation of complex numbers. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or (MATH 1533 or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1533) or appropriate placement score.
MATH 2053 - Math Analysis for Business 27778 This course explores the mechanics underlying differential and integral calculus, as well as, their applications to business. It primarily focuses on single variable functions, but it will also introduce multivariable functions. This course is designed to equip business students with the tools to solve problems involving limits, differentiation, interpretations of the derivative, antiderivatives, indefinite and definite integrals, and partial differentiation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1453 or MATH 1513 or MATH 1533 or High School Algebra II all with a minimum grade of “C” or appropriate placement score.
STAT 2103 - Intro Statistics for Sciences 27779 This course is an introduction to statistical methods with an emphasis on scientific applications. Students will be exposed to descriptive statistics, probability, estimation methods, hypothesis testing, linear regression, and correlation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or high school Algebra II with a minimum grade of “C”.

Spring 2018 - SPOC Block 2



Enrollment Start Date 1/8/2018
Enrollment End Date 3/2/2018
Refund Deadline 1/14/2018
Withdrawal Deadline 2/15/2018


ESFR 5413 - Foundations of Gifted ED 27724 The purpose of this course is to introduce concepts and techniques for providing differentiated educational strategies for gifted and talented students. The historical and cultural foundation of gifted education programs provides a framework to examine different types of current-day gifted education programs, characteristics and identification procedures of gifted students, and gifted education theory and pedagogy. In addition, this course examines relevant state and federal polices related to gifted and talented education.
ESFR 5423 - Social Emotional Needs of the Gifted 27730 Understanding the social emotional needs of gifted learners is a complex and multifaceted study. This course is designed to create awareness and advocacy for educators and parents working with gifted students. An overview of the social and emotional issues surrounding gifted students offers participants in- depth exploration into the affective education needed to guide gifted youth. Participants will also develop a working knowledge of the influence of culture, family, friendships, expectations, gender, and self and societal pressures on gifted students and their identity.
ESFR 5453 - Leadership for Gifted ED 27737 This course examines how laws and public policy impact leadership in gifted education. Foundational knowledge and leadership skills required to implement communication, collaboration, and consultation in multiple areas of gifted education, as aligned to national, state, and local standards, and to evidence- based and most current best practice in gifted education, will be the main areas of focus in this course. Prerequisite(s): ESFR 5413 and 5433 and graduate standing.
FIN 3413 - Real Estate Principles 27858 Methods and practices of operating real estate agencies; conveyance of title, leases, mortgages, liens, contracts to buy or sell; methods of financing; zoning laws, subdividing, developing, agency management; appraisal practices.
FIN 3423 - Real Estate Practice 27833 Continuation of real estate principles with emphasis on practical and operational problems of the broker. Among topics covered will be listings, advertising, sales training, property valuation, property management, office management and closings. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3413.
FIN 3473 - Real Property Management 27745 Developing, executing and evaluating comprehensive plans for the management of various kinds of real estate including: office buildings, industrial properties, hotels, store property, conventional housing; handling tenant credit and collections; dealing with maintenance problems; maintaining records and accounting.
FIN 3603 - Financial Statement Analysis 28014 Techniques and principles in the detailed analysis of accounting statements from the viewpoint of lenders, investors, or the financial managers of the firm. Not open to accounting majors. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3563.
GEO 2303 - Regional Geo Of The World TBA A study of the world’s major regions. Each region’s physical, cultural, and politico-economic characteristics are reviewed. Region-wide cooperation patterns are discussed and compared. Most major countries in the region are introduced with emphasis on related current issues.
HIST 1483 - History Of U.S. to 1877 TBA US History to 1877 is a survey of US history from the colonial period through the Civil War.
MATH 1513 - College Algebra 28007 This course is an overview of algebraic topics used in real world applications. Topics include complex numbers, variation, solving equations and inequalities, properties and the algebra of functions, graphing basic functions and their transformations, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, as well as modeling and real world applications. This course also serves as a preparatory course for Bio-Calculus and Mathematical Analysis for Business. Credit may be earned in only one course from MATH 1453 or MATH 1513.
MATH 1593 - Plane Trigonometry 27982 The course content focuses on trigonometric functions, equations and identities. Students will also learn solutions of triangles and the trigonometric representation of complex numbers. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or (MATH 1533 or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1533) or appropriate placement score.
MATH 2053 - Math Analysis for Business 28028 This course explores the mechanics underlying differential and integral calculus, as well as, their applications to business. It primarily focuses on single variable functions, but it will also introduce multivariable functions. This course is designed to equip business students with the tools to solve problems involving limits, differentiation, interpretations of the derivative, antiderivatives, indefinite and definite integrals, and partial differentiation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1453 or MATH 1513 or MATH 1533 or High School Algebra II all with a minimum grade of “C” or appropriate placement score.
STAT 2103 - Intro Statistics for Sciences 27822 This course is an introduction to statistical methods with an emphasis on scientific applications. Students will be exposed to descriptive statistics, probability, estimation methods, hypothesis testing, linear regression, and correlation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or high school Algebra II with a minimum grade of “C”.

Spring 2018 - SPOC Block 3



Enrollment Start Date 1/22/2018
Enrollment End Date 3/16/2018
Refund Deadline 1/28/2018
Withdrawal Deadline 3/1/2018


BIO 1114 - General Biology 28142 This is an introduction to the life sciences as a course to fulfill the general education requirement for non-biology majors. The topics include an introduction to the fundamental principles of biology, the scientific method, cell structure and organization, biological molecules and metabolism, the levels of biological organization and systematics, plant and animal systems, Mendelian genetics, heredity, evolution and ecology. This course does not have an accompanying laboratory session and does not count towards a B.S. degree in Biology. A student will not receive credit for having taken both BIO 1114 and BIO 1214.
CJ 2413 - Careers & Technologies in CJ Under Development Careers and Technologies in Criminal Justice is designed to introduce students to the many career paths that exist in criminal justice and common skill sets needed for communication, problem solving and leadership abilities that are required by various agencies. Students will also explore the history of technologies used by CJ, as well as current and future trends.
CSDY 4583 - Writing SciFi/Fantasy 28263 Writing Science Fiction and Fantasy is an intensive, workshop-based creative writing course that provides students with a comprehensive overview of the history, composition, revision and marketing of works of science fiction and fantasy literature. This course may be taken three times for credit. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1113 and ENG 1213.
CSDY 5583 - Writing SciFi/Fantasy 28264 Writing Science Fiction and Fantasy is an intensive, workshop-based creative writing course that provides students with a comprehensive overview of the history, composition, revision and marketing of works of science fiction and fantasy literature.
ENG 4910 - Asian Ghost Tales: Film and Fiction 28203 Students will study the Asian narratives of the paranormal, the supernatural and the macabre. By approaching these happenings of the ghosts, demons and the strange, they will learn about the cultural, familial, and even political nature of Asian society. Furthermore, these Asian metaphysical and mystical mysteries tell us much about the nature of the dead and undead beings as seen from Confucian and Buddhists perspectives. Each country also brings its own native religions into play: Taoism (China), Shamanism (Korea), and Shintoism (Japan). Students shall gain a way to better and understanding Asian society and even Western society. Questions about cultural transparency will be asked when comparisons are made with Western ghost narratives and traditions. Thus, students will learn to objectively question our own social fears, taboos, and norms when reflected against the mirror that is Eastern supernatural tales of darkness, lust, and revenge. ENG 4910 Prerequisites: Senior standing. ENG 5910 Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
ENG 5910 - Asian Ghost Tales: Film and Fiction 28204 Students will study the Asian narratives of the paranormal, the supernatural and the macabre. By approaching these happenings of the ghosts, demons and the strange, they will learn about the cultural, familial, and even political nature of Asian society. Furthermore, these Asian metaphysical and mystical mysteries tell us much about the nature of the dead and undead beings as seen from Confucian and Buddhists perspectives. Each country also brings its own native religions into play: Taoism (China), Shamanism (Korea), and Shintoism (Japan). Students shall gain a way to better and understanding Asian society and even Western society. Questions about cultural transparency will be asked when comparisons are made with Western ghost narratives and traditions. Thus, students will learn to objectively question our own social fears, taboos, and norms when reflected against the mirror that is Eastern supernatural tales of darkness, lust, and revenge. ENG 4910 Prerequisites: Senior standing. ENG 5910 Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
ENG 4910 - Samurai Film Literature 28213 The course examines the films and literature of the samurai. Students will read non-fiction, philosophy, and fiction. They will also explore samurai films and its influences into Western culture. The samurai lore will be studied from Confucian, Shinto and Buddhism viewpoints. ENG 4910 Prerequisites: Senior standing. ENG 5910 Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
ENG 5910 - Samurai Film Literature 28214 The course examines the films and literature of the samurai. Students will read non-fiction, philosophy, and fiction. They will also explore samurai films and its influences into Western culture. The samurai lore will be studied from Confucian, Shinto and Buddhism viewpoints. ENG 4910 Prerequisites: Senior standing. ENG 5910 Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
ESFR 5413 - Foundations of Gifted ED 27725 The purpose of this course is to introduce concepts and techniques for providing differentiated educational strategies for gifted and talented students. The historical and cultural foundation of gifted education programs provides a framework to examine different types of current-day gifted education programs, characteristics and identification procedures of gifted students, and gifted education theory and pedagogy. In addition, this course examines relevant state and federal polices related to gifted and talented education.
ESFR 5423 - Social Emotional Needs of the Gifted 27731 Understanding the social emotional needs of gifted learners is a complex and multifaceted study. This course is designed to create awareness and advocacy for educators and parents working with gifted students. An overview of the social and emotional issues surrounding gifted students offers participants in- depth exploration into the affective education needed to guide gifted youth. Participants will also develop a working knowledge of the influence of culture, family, friendships, expectations, gender, and self and societal pressures on gifted students and their identity.
ESFR 5453 - Leadership for Gifted ED 27738 This course examines how laws and public policy impact leadership in gifted education. Foundational knowledge and leadership skills required to implement communication, collaboration, and consultation in multiple areas of gifted education, as aligned to national, state, and local standards, and to evidence- based and most current best practice in gifted education, will be the main areas of focus in this course. Prerequisite(s): ESFR 5413 and 5433 and graduate standing.
FIN 3413 - Real Estate Principles 27859 Methods and practices of operating real estate agencies; conveyance of title, leases, mortgages, liens, contracts to buy or sell; methods of financing; zoning laws, subdividing, developing, agency management; appraisal practices.
FIN 3423 - Real Estate Practice 27834 Continuation of real estate principles with emphasis on practical and operational problems of the broker. Among topics covered will be listings, advertising, sales training, property valuation, property management, office management and closings. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3413.
FIN 3473 - Real Property Management 27746 Developing, executing and evaluating comprehensive plans for the management of various kinds of real estate including: office buildings, industrial properties, hotels, store property, conventional housing; handling tenant credit and collections; dealing with maintenance problems; maintaining records and accounting.
FIN 3603 - Financial Statement Analysis 28015 Techniques and principles in the detailed analysis of accounting statements from the viewpoint of lenders, investors, or the financial managers of the firm. Not open to accounting majors. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3563.
GEO 2303 - Regional Geo Of The World 28225 A study of the world’s major regions. Each region’s physical, cultural, and politico-economic characteristics are reviewed. Region-wide cooperation patterns are discussed and compared. Most major countries in the region are introduced with emphasis on related current issues.
HIST 1483 - History Of U.S. to 1877 28231 US History to 1877 is a survey of US history from the colonial period through the Civil War.
MATH 1513 - College Algebra 28008 This course is an overview of algebraic topics used in real world applications. Topics include complex numbers, variation, solving equations and inequalities, properties and the algebra of functions, graphing basic functions and their transformations, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, as well as modeling and real world applications. This course also serves as a preparatory course for Bio-Calculus and Mathematical Analysis for Business. Credit may be earned in only one course from MATH 1453 or MATH 1513.
MATH 1593 - Plane Trigonometry 28071 The course content focuses on trigonometric functions, equations and identities. Students will also learn solutions of triangles and the trigonometric representation of complex numbers. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or (MATH 1533 or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1533) or appropriate placement score.
MATH 2053 - Math Analysis for Business 28029 This course explores the mechanics underlying differential and integral calculus, as well as, their applications to business. It primarily focuses on single variable functions, but it will also introduce multivariable functions. This course is designed to equip business students with the tools to solve problems involving limits, differentiation, interpretations of the derivative, antiderivatives, indefinite and definite integrals, and partial differentiation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1453 or MATH 1513 or MATH 1533 or High School Algebra II all with a minimum grade of “C” or appropriate placement score.
STAT 2103 - Intro Statistics for Sciences 27823 This course is an introduction to statistical methods with an emphasis on scientific applications. Students will be exposed to descriptive statistics, probability, estimation methods, hypothesis testing, linear regression, and correlation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or high school Algebra II with a minimum grade of “C”.

Spring 2018 - SPOC Block 4



Enrollment Start Date 2/5/2018
Enrollment End Date 3/30/2018
Refund Deadline 2/11/2018
Withdrawal Deadline 3/15/2018


BIO 1114 - General Biology 28143 This is an introduction to the life sciences as a course to fulfill the general education requirement for non-biology majors. The topics include an introduction to the fundamental principles of biology, the scientific method, cell structure and organization, biological molecules and metabolism, the levels of biological organization and systematics, plant and animal systems, Mendelian genetics, heredity, evolution and ecology. This course does not have an accompanying laboratory session and does not count towards a B.S. degree in Biology. A student will not receive credit for having taken both BIO 1114 and BIO 1214.
CJ 1313 - Writing for CJ Professionals 28333 Writing for Criminal Justice Professionals focuses on the unique types of writing required in the criminal justice field, including but not limited to research papers, investigative and prosecutorial reports, press 301 University of Central Oklahoma Undergraduate Catalog 2017-2018 releases, search warrants, and probation reports. Emphasis will be placed on clear and effective writing. As part of the learning process, students will critique the writing of others. Students will learn and be able to demonstrate their ability to use the American Psychological Association (APA) citation style. Prerequisite(s): Enrollment open to Criminal Justice majors only.
CJ 2413 - Careers & Technologies in CJ Under Development Careers and Technologies in Criminal Justice is designed to introduce students to the many career paths that exist in criminal justice and common skill sets needed for communication, problem solving and leadership abilities that are required by various agencies. Students will also explore the history of technologies used by CJ, as well as current and future trends.
ENG 4910 - Asian Ghost Tales: Film and Fiction 28205 Students will study the Asian narratives of the paranormal, the supernatural and the macabre. By approaching these happenings of the ghosts, demons and the strange, they will learn about the cultural, familial, and even political nature of Asian society. Furthermore, these Asian metaphysical and mystical mysteries tell us much about the nature of the dead and undead beings as seen from Confucian and Buddhists perspectives. Each country also brings its own native religions into play: Taoism (China), Shamanism (Korea), and Shintoism (Japan). Students shall gain a way to better and understanding Asian society and even Western society. Questions about cultural transparency will be asked when comparisons are made with Western ghost narratives and traditions. Thus, students will learn to objectively question our own social fears, taboos, and norms when reflected against the mirror that is Eastern supernatural tales of darkness, lust, and revenge. ENG 4910 Prerequisites: Senior standing. ENG 5910 Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
ENG 5910 - Asian Ghost Tales: Film and Fiction 28206 Students will study the Asian narratives of the paranormal, the supernatural and the macabre. By approaching these happenings of the ghosts, demons and the strange, they will learn about the cultural, familial, and even political nature of Asian society. Furthermore, these Asian metaphysical and mystical mysteries tell us much about the nature of the dead and undead beings as seen from Confucian and Buddhists perspectives. Each country also brings its own native religions into play: Taoism (China), Shamanism (Korea), and Shintoism (Japan). Students shall gain a way to better and understanding Asian society and even Western society. Questions about cultural transparency will be asked when comparisons are made with Western ghost narratives and traditions. Thus, students will learn to objectively question our own social fears, taboos, and norms when reflected against the mirror that is Eastern supernatural tales of darkness, lust, and revenge. ENG 4910 Prerequisites: Senior standing. ENG 5910 Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
ENG 4910 - Samurai Film Literature 28215 The course examines the films and literature of the samurai. Students will read non-fiction, philosophy, and fiction. They will also explore samurai films and its influences into Western culture. The samurai lore will be studied from Confucian, Shinto and Buddhism viewpoints. ENG 4910 Prerequisites: Senior standing. ENG 5910 Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
ENG 5910 - Samurai Film Literature 28216 The course examines the films and literature of the samurai. Students will read non-fiction, philosophy, and fiction. They will also explore samurai films and its influences into Western culture. The samurai lore will be studied from Confucian, Shinto and Buddhism viewpoints. ENG 4910 Prerequisites: Senior standing. ENG 5910 Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
ESFR 5413 - Foundations of Gifted ED 27726 The purpose of this course is to introduce concepts and techniques for providing differentiated educational strategies for gifted and talented students. The historical and cultural foundation of gifted education programs provides a framework to examine different types of current-day gifted education programs, characteristics and identification procedures of gifted students, and gifted education theory and pedagogy. In addition, this course examines relevant state and federal polices related to gifted and talented education.
ESFR 5423 - Social Emotional Needs of the Gifted 27732 Understanding the social emotional needs of gifted learners is a complex and multifaceted study. This course is designed to create awareness and advocacy for educators and parents working with gifted students. An overview of the social and emotional issues surrounding gifted students offers participants in- depth exploration into the affective education needed to guide gifted youth. Participants will also develop a working knowledge of the influence of culture, family, friendships, expectations, gender, and self and societal pressures on gifted students and their identity.
ESFR 5453 - Leadership for Gifted ED 27739 This course examines how laws and public policy impact leadership in gifted education. Foundational knowledge and leadership skills required to implement communication, collaboration, and consultation in multiple areas of gifted education, as aligned to national, state, and local standards, and to evidence- based and most current best practice in gifted education, will be the main areas of focus in this course. Prerequisite(s): ESFR 5413 and 5433 and graduate standing.
FIN 2313 - Personal Finance 28329 A survey of the field of personal financial management with major emphasis on problems of budgeting, insurance, bank services, credit usage, and investing.
FIN 3413 - Real Estate Principles 27860 Methods and practices of operating real estate agencies; conveyance of title, leases, mortgages, liens, contracts to buy or sell; methods of financing; zoning laws, subdividing, developing, agency management; appraisal practices.
FIN 3423 - Real Estate Practice 27835 Continuation of real estate principles with emphasis on practical and operational problems of the broker. Among topics covered will be listings, advertising, sales training, property valuation, property management, office management and closings. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3413.
FIN 3473 - Real Property Management 27747 Developing, executing and evaluating comprehensive plans for the management of various kinds of real estate including: office buildings, industrial properties, hotels, store property, conventional housing; handling tenant credit and collections; dealing with maintenance problems; maintaining records and accounting.
GEO 2303 - Regional Geo Of The World 28226 A study of the world’s major regions. Each region’s physical, cultural, and politico-economic characteristics are reviewed. Region-wide cooperation patterns are discussed and compared. Most major countries in the region are introduced with emphasis on related current issues.
HIST 1483 - History Of U.S. to 1877 28232 US History to 1877 is a survey of US history from the colonial period through the Civil War.
MATH 1513 - College Algebra 28010 This course is an overview of algebraic topics used in real world applications. Topics include complex numbers, variation, solving equations and inequalities, properties and the algebra of functions, graphing basic functions and their transformations, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, as well as modeling and real world applications. This course also serves as a preparatory course for Bio-Calculus and Mathematical Analysis for Business. Credit may be earned in only one course from MATH 1453 or MATH 1513.
MATH 1593 - Plane Trigonometry 28072 The course content focuses on trigonometric functions, equations and identities. Students will also learn solutions of triangles and the trigonometric representation of complex numbers. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or (MATH 1533 or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1533) or appropriate placement score.
MATH 2053 - Math Analysis for Business 28030 This course explores the mechanics underlying differential and integral calculus, as well as, their applications to business. It primarily focuses on single variable functions, but it will also introduce multivariable functions. This course is designed to equip business students with the tools to solve problems involving limits, differentiation, interpretations of the derivative, antiderivatives, indefinite and definite integrals, and partial differentiation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1453 or MATH 1513 or MATH 1533 or High School Algebra II all with a minimum grade of “C” or appropriate placement score.
SOC 3203 - Minorities in American Society 28280 Minorities in American Society provides an understand the concept of minority group and minority group behavior; the extent of the sociocultural reasons for prejudice and discrimination; and contemporary dominant-minority group relations in the United States. Prerequisite(s): SOC 2103 and junior standing or above.
SOC 3403 - The Family 28284 A history of the family as a social and educational institution; problems confronting the modern family. Prerequisite(s): SOC 2103 or FMCD 2223 and sophomore standing or above.
SOC 4443 - Social Stratification 28288 Social Stratification will explore theories of class and caste, wealth, status, and power, and the American class system. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1113, 1213, and SOC 2103 with junior standing or above.
STAT 2103 - Intro Statistics for Sciences 27824 This course is an introduction to statistical methods with an emphasis on scientific applications. Students will be exposed to descriptive statistics, probability, estimation methods, hypothesis testing, linear regression, and correlation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or high school Algebra II with a minimum grade of “C”.

Spring 2018 - SPOC Block 5



Enrollment Start Date 2/19/2018
Enrollment End Date 4/13/2018
Refund Deadline 2/25/2018
Withdrawal Deadline 3/29/2018


BIO 1114 - General Biology 28144 This is an introduction to the life sciences as a course to fulfill the general education requirement for non-biology majors. The topics include an introduction to the fundamental principles of biology, the scientific method, cell structure and organization, biological molecules and metabolism, the levels of biological organization and systematics, plant and animal systems, Mendelian genetics, heredity, evolution and ecology. This course does not have an accompanying laboratory session and does not count towards a B.S. degree in Biology. A student will not receive credit for having taken both BIO 1114 and BIO 1214.
CJ 1313 - Writing for CJ Professionals 28334 Writing for Criminal Justice Professionals focuses on the unique types of writing required in the criminal justice field, including but not limited to research papers, investigative and prosecutorial reports, press 301 University of Central Oklahoma Undergraduate Catalog 2017-2018 releases, search warrants, and probation reports. Emphasis will be placed on clear and effective writing. As part of the learning process, students will critique the writing of others. Students will learn and be able to demonstrate their ability to use the American Psychological Association (APA) citation style. Prerequisite(s): Enrollment open to Criminal Justice majors only.
CJ 2413 - Careers & Technologies in CJ Under Development Careers and Technologies in Criminal Justice is designed to introduce students to the many career paths that exist in criminal justice and common skill sets needed for communication, problem solving and leadership abilities that are required by various agencies. Students will also explore the history of technologies used by CJ, as well as current and future trends.
ENG 4910 - Asian Ghost Tales: Film and Fiction 28207 Students will study the Asian narratives of the paranormal, the supernatural and the macabre. By approaching these happenings of the ghosts, demons and the strange, they will learn about the cultural, familial, and even political nature of Asian society. Furthermore, these Asian metaphysical and mystical mysteries tell us much about the nature of the dead and undead beings as seen from Confucian and Buddhists perspectives. Each country also brings its own native religions into play: Taoism (China), Shamanism (Korea), and Shintoism (Japan). Students shall gain a way to better and understanding Asian society and even Western society. Questions about cultural transparency will be asked when comparisons are made with Western ghost narratives and traditions. Thus, students will learn to objectively question our own social fears, taboos, and norms when reflected against the mirror that is Eastern supernatural tales of darkness, lust, and revenge. ENG 4910 Prerequisites: Senior standing. ENG 5910 Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
ENG 5910 - Asian Ghost Tales: Film and Fiction 28208 Students will study the Asian narratives of the paranormal, the supernatural and the macabre. By approaching these happenings of the ghosts, demons and the strange, they will learn about the cultural, familial, and even political nature of Asian society. Furthermore, these Asian metaphysical and mystical mysteries tell us much about the nature of the dead and undead beings as seen from Confucian and Buddhists perspectives. Each country also brings its own native religions into play: Taoism (China), Shamanism (Korea), and Shintoism (Japan). Students shall gain a way to better and understanding Asian society and even Western society. Questions about cultural transparency will be asked when comparisons are made with Western ghost narratives and traditions. Thus, students will learn to objectively question our own social fears, taboos, and norms when reflected against the mirror that is Eastern supernatural tales of darkness, lust, and revenge. ENG 4910 Prerequisites: Senior standing. ENG 5910 Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
ENG 4910 - Samurai Film Literature 28218 The course examines the films and literature of the samurai. Students will read non-fiction, philosophy, and fiction. They will also explore samurai films and its influences into Western culture. The samurai lore will be studied from Confucian, Shinto and Buddhism viewpoints. ENG 4910 Prerequisites: Senior standing. ENG 5910 Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
ENG 5910 - Samurai Film Literature 28219 The course examines the films and literature of the samurai. Students will read non-fiction, philosophy, and fiction. They will also explore samurai films and its influences into Western culture. The samurai lore will be studied from Confucian, Shinto and Buddhism viewpoints. ENG 4910 Prerequisites: Senior standing. ENG 5910 Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
ESFR 5413 - Foundations of Gifted ED 27727 The purpose of this course is to introduce concepts and techniques for providing differentiated educational strategies for gifted and talented students. The historical and cultural foundation of gifted education programs provides a framework to examine different types of current-day gifted education programs, characteristics and identification procedures of gifted students, and gifted education theory and pedagogy. In addition, this course examines relevant state and federal polices related to gifted and talented education.
ESFR 5423 - Social Emotional Needs of the Gifted 27733 Understanding the social emotional needs of gifted learners is a complex and multifaceted study. This course is designed to create awareness and advocacy for educators and parents working with gifted students. An overview of the social and emotional issues surrounding gifted students offers participants in- depth exploration into the affective education needed to guide gifted youth. Participants will also develop a working knowledge of the influence of culture, family, friendships, expectations, gender, and self and societal pressures on gifted students and their identity.
ESFR 5453 - Leadership for Gifted ED 27740 This course examines how laws and public policy impact leadership in gifted education. Foundational knowledge and leadership skills required to implement communication, collaboration, and consultation in multiple areas of gifted education, as aligned to national, state, and local standards, and to evidence- based and most current best practice in gifted education, will be the main areas of focus in this course. Prerequisite(s): ESFR 5413 and 5433 and graduate standing.
FIN 2313 - Personal Finance 28330 A survey of the field of personal financial management with major emphasis on problems of budgeting, insurance, bank services, credit usage, and investing.
FIN 3413 - Real Estate Principles 27861 Methods and practices of operating real estate agencies; conveyance of title, leases, mortgages, liens, contracts to buy or sell; methods of financing; zoning laws, subdividing, developing, agency management; appraisal practices.
FIN 3423 - Real Estate Practice 27836 Continuation of real estate principles with emphasis on practical and operational problems of the broker. Among topics covered will be listings, advertising, sales training, property valuation, property management, office management and closings. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3413.
FIN 3473 - Real Property Management 27748 Developing, executing and evaluating comprehensive plans for the management of various kinds of real estate including: office buildings, industrial properties, hotels, store property, conventional housing; handling tenant credit and collections; dealing with maintenance problems; maintaining records and accounting.
GEO 2303 - Regional Geo Of The World 28228 A study of the world’s major regions. Each region’s physical, cultural, and politico-economic characteristics are reviewed. Region-wide cooperation patterns are discussed and compared. Most major countries in the region are introduced with emphasis on related current issues.
HIST 1483 - History Of U.S. to 1877 28233 US History to 1877 is a survey of US history from the colonial period through the Civil War.
HIST 1493 - History Of U.S. Since 1877 28353 US History since 1877 is a survey of US history from the post-bellum period to the present
MATH 1513 - College Algebra 28023 This course is an overview of algebraic topics used in real world applications. Topics include complex numbers, variation, solving equations and inequalities, properties and the algebra of functions, graphing basic functions and their transformations, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, as well as modeling and real world applications. This course also serves as a preparatory course for Bio-Calculus and Mathematical Analysis for Business. Credit may be earned in only one course from MATH 1453 or MATH 1513.
MATH 1593 - Plane Trigonometry 28073 The course content focuses on trigonometric functions, equations and identities. Students will also learn solutions of triangles and the trigonometric representation of complex numbers. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or (MATH 1533 or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1533) or appropriate placement score.
MATH 2053 - Math Analysis for Business 28031 This course explores the mechanics underlying differential and integral calculus, as well as, their applications to business. It primarily focuses on single variable functions, but it will also introduce multivariable functions. This course is designed to equip business students with the tools to solve problems involving limits, differentiation, interpretations of the derivative, antiderivatives, indefinite and definite integrals, and partial differentiation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1453 or MATH 1513 or MATH 1533 or High School Algebra II all with a minimum grade of “C” or appropriate placement score.
SOC 3203 - Minorities in American Society 28281 Minorities in American Society provides an understand the concept of minority group and minority group behavior; the extent of the sociocultural reasons for prejudice and discrimination; and contemporary dominant-minority group relations in the United States. Prerequisite(s): SOC 2103 and junior standing or above.
SOC 3403 - The Family 28285 A history of the family as a social and educational institution; problems confronting the modern family. Prerequisite(s): SOC 2103 or FMCD 2223 and sophomore standing or above.
SOC 4443 - Social Stratification 28289 Social Stratification will explore theories of class and caste, wealth, status, and power, and the American class system. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1113, 1213, and SOC 2103 with junior standing or above.
STAT 2103 - Intro Statistics for Sciences 27825 This course is an introduction to statistical methods with an emphasis on scientific applications. Students will be exposed to descriptive statistics, probability, estimation methods, hypothesis testing, linear regression, and correlation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or high school Algebra II with a minimum grade of “C”.

Spring 2018 - SPOC Block 6



Enrollment Start Date 3/5/2018
Enrollment End Date 4/27/2018
Refund Deadline 3/11/2018
Withdrawal Deadline 4/12/2018


BIO 1114 - General Biology 28145 This is an introduction to the life sciences as a course to fulfill the general education requirement for non-biology majors. The topics include an introduction to the fundamental principles of biology, the scientific method, cell structure and organization, biological molecules and metabolism, the levels of biological organization and systematics, plant and animal systems, Mendelian genetics, heredity, evolution and ecology. This course does not have an accompanying laboratory session and does not count towards a B.S. degree in Biology. A student will not receive credit for having taken both BIO 1114 and BIO 1214.
CJ 1313 - Writing for CJ Professionals 28335 Writing for Criminal Justice Professionals focuses on the unique types of writing required in the criminal justice field, including but not limited to research papers, investigative and prosecutorial reports, press 301 University of Central Oklahoma Undergraduate Catalog 2017-2018 releases, search warrants, and probation reports. Emphasis will be placed on clear and effective writing. As part of the learning process, students will critique the writing of others. Students will learn and be able to demonstrate their ability to use the American Psychological Association (APA) citation style. Prerequisite(s): Enrollment open to Criminal Justice majors only.
CJ 2413 - Careers & Technologies in CJ Under Development Careers and Technologies in Criminal Justice is designed to introduce students to the many career paths that exist in criminal justice and common skill sets needed for communication, problem solving and leadership abilities that are required by various agencies. Students will also explore the history of technologies used by CJ, as well as current and future trends.
ENG 4910 - Asian Ghost Tales: Film and Fiction 28209 Students will study the Asian narratives of the paranormal, the supernatural and the macabre. By approaching these happenings of the ghosts, demons and the strange, they will learn about the cultural, familial, and even political nature of Asian society. Furthermore, these Asian metaphysical and mystical mysteries tell us much about the nature of the dead and undead beings as seen from Confucian and Buddhists perspectives. Each country also brings its own native religions into play: Taoism (China), Shamanism (Korea), and Shintoism (Japan). Students shall gain a way to better and understanding Asian society and even Western society. Questions about cultural transparency will be asked when comparisons are made with Western ghost narratives and traditions. Thus, students will learn to objectively question our own social fears, taboos, and norms when reflected against the mirror that is Eastern supernatural tales of darkness, lust, and revenge. ENG 4910 Prerequisites: Senior standing. ENG 5910 Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
ENG 5910 - Asian Ghost Tales: Film and Fiction 28210 Students will study the Asian narratives of the paranormal, the supernatural and the macabre. By approaching these happenings of the ghosts, demons and the strange, they will learn about the cultural, familial, and even political nature of Asian society. Furthermore, these Asian metaphysical and mystical mysteries tell us much about the nature of the dead and undead beings as seen from Confucian and Buddhists perspectives. Each country also brings its own native religions into play: Taoism (China), Shamanism (Korea), and Shintoism (Japan). Students shall gain a way to better and understanding Asian society and even Western society. Questions about cultural transparency will be asked when comparisons are made with Western ghost narratives and traditions. Thus, students will learn to objectively question our own social fears, taboos, and norms when reflected against the mirror that is Eastern supernatural tales of darkness, lust, and revenge. ENG 4910 Prerequisites: Senior standing. ENG 5910 Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
ENG 4910 - Samurai Film Literature 28220 The course examines the films and literature of the samurai. Students will read non-fiction, philosophy, and fiction. They will also explore samurai films and its influences into Western culture. The samurai lore will be studied from Confucian, Shinto and Buddhism viewpoints. ENG 4910 Prerequisites: Senior standing. ENG 5910 Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
ENG 5910 - Samurai Film Literature 28221 The course examines the films and literature of the samurai. Students will read non-fiction, philosophy, and fiction. They will also explore samurai films and its influences into Western culture. The samurai lore will be studied from Confucian, Shinto and Buddhism viewpoints. ENG 4910 Prerequisites: Senior standing. ENG 5910 Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
ESFR 5413 - Foundations of Gifted ED 27728 The purpose of this course is to introduce concepts and techniques for providing differentiated educational strategies for gifted and talented students. The historical and cultural foundation of gifted education programs provides a framework to examine different types of current-day gifted education programs, characteristics and identification procedures of gifted students, and gifted education theory and pedagogy. In addition, this course examines relevant state and federal polices related to gifted and talented education.
ESFR 5423 - Social Emotional Needs of the Gifted 27734 Understanding the social emotional needs of gifted learners is a complex and multifaceted study. This course is designed to create awareness and advocacy for educators and parents working with gifted students. An overview of the social and emotional issues surrounding gifted students offers participants in- depth exploration into the affective education needed to guide gifted youth. Participants will also develop a working knowledge of the influence of culture, family, friendships, expectations, gender, and self and societal pressures on gifted students and their identity.
ESFR 5453 - Leadership for Gifted ED 27741 This course examines how laws and public policy impact leadership in gifted education. Foundational knowledge and leadership skills required to implement communication, collaboration, and consultation in multiple areas of gifted education, as aligned to national, state, and local standards, and to evidence- based and most current best practice in gifted education, will be the main areas of focus in this course. Prerequisite(s): ESFR 5413 and 5433 and graduate standing.
FIN 2313 - Personal Finance 28331 A survey of the field of personal financial management with major emphasis on problems of budgeting, insurance, bank services, credit usage, and investing.
FIN 3413 - Real Estate Principles 27862 Methods and practices of operating real estate agencies; conveyance of title, leases, mortgages, liens, contracts to buy or sell; methods of financing; zoning laws, subdividing, developing, agency management; appraisal practices.
FIN 3423 - Real Estate Practice 27837 Continuation of real estate principles with emphasis on practical and operational problems of the broker. Among topics covered will be listings, advertising, sales training, property valuation, property management, office management and closings. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3413.
FIN 3473 - Real Property Management 27749 Developing, executing and evaluating comprehensive plans for the management of various kinds of real estate including: office buildings, industrial properties, hotels, store property, conventional housing; handling tenant credit and collections; dealing with maintenance problems; maintaining records and accounting.
GEO 2303 - Regional Geo Of The World 28229 A study of the world’s major regions. Each region’s physical, cultural, and politico-economic characteristics are reviewed. Region-wide cooperation patterns are discussed and compared. Most major countries in the region are introduced with emphasis on related current issues.
HIST 1483 - History Of U.S. to 1877 28234 US History to 1877 is a survey of US history from the colonial period through the Civil War.
HIST 1493 - History Of U.S. Since 1877 28354 US History since 1877 is a survey of US history from the post-bellum period to the present
MATH 1513 - College Algebra 28011 This course is an overview of algebraic topics used in real world applications. Topics include complex numbers, variation, solving equations and inequalities, properties and the algebra of functions, graphing basic functions and their transformations, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, as well as modeling and real world applications. This course also serves as a preparatory course for Bio-Calculus and Mathematical Analysis for Business. Credit may be earned in only one course from MATH 1453 or MATH 1513.
MATH 1593 - Plane Trigonometry 28074 The course content focuses on trigonometric functions, equations and identities. Students will also learn solutions of triangles and the trigonometric representation of complex numbers. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or (MATH 1533 or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1533) or appropriate placement score.
MATH 2053 - Math Analysis for Business 28032 This course explores the mechanics underlying differential and integral calculus, as well as, their applications to business. It primarily focuses on single variable functions, but it will also introduce multivariable functions. This course is designed to equip business students with the tools to solve problems involving limits, differentiation, interpretations of the derivative, antiderivatives, indefinite and definite integrals, and partial differentiation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1453 or MATH 1513 or MATH 1533 or High School Algebra II all with a minimum grade of “C” or appropriate placement score.
SOC 3203 - Minorities in American Society 28282 Minorities in American Society provides an understand the concept of minority group and minority group behavior; the extent of the sociocultural reasons for prejudice and discrimination; and contemporary dominant-minority group relations in the United States. Prerequisite(s): SOC 2103 and junior standing or above.
SOC 3403 - The Family 28286 A history of the family as a social and educational institution; problems confronting the modern family. Prerequisite(s): SOC 2103 or FMCD 2223 and sophomore standing or above.
SOC 4443 - Social Stratification 28290 Social Stratification will explore theories of class and caste, wealth, status, and power, and the American class system. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1113, 1213, and SOC 2103 with junior standing or above.
STAT 2103 - Intro Statistics for Sciences 27826 This course is an introduction to statistical methods with an emphasis on scientific applications. Students will be exposed to descriptive statistics, probability, estimation methods, hypothesis testing, linear regression, and correlation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or high school Algebra II with a minimum grade of “C”.

Spring 2018 - SPOC Block 7



Enrollment Start Date 3/19/2018
Enrollment End Date 4/27/2018
Refund Deadline 3/23/2018
Withdrawal Deadline 4/16/2018


BIO 1114 - General Biology 28146 This is an introduction to the life sciences as a course to fulfill the general education requirement for non-biology majors. The topics include an introduction to the fundamental principles of biology, the scientific method, cell structure and organization, biological molecules and metabolism, the levels of biological organization and systematics, plant and animal systems, Mendelian genetics, heredity, evolution and ecology. This course does not have an accompanying laboratory session and does not count towards a B.S. degree in Biology. A student will not receive credit for having taken both BIO 1114 and BIO 1214.
CJ 1313 - Writing for CJ Professionals 28336 Writing for Criminal Justice Professionals focuses on the unique types of writing required in the criminal justice field, including but not limited to research papers, investigative and prosecutorial reports, press 301 University of Central Oklahoma Undergraduate Catalog 2017-2018 releases, search warrants, and probation reports. Emphasis will be placed on clear and effective writing. As part of the learning process, students will critique the writing of others. Students will learn and be able to demonstrate their ability to use the American Psychological Association (APA) citation style. Prerequisite(s): Enrollment open to Criminal Justice majors only.
CJ 2413 - Careers & Technologies in CJ Under Development Careers and Technologies in Criminal Justice is designed to introduce students to the many career paths that exist in criminal justice and common skill sets needed for communication, problem solving and leadership abilities that are required by various agencies. Students will also explore the history of technologies used by CJ, as well as current and future trends.
ENG 4910 - Asian Ghost Tales: Film and Fiction 28211 Students will study the Asian narratives of the paranormal, the supernatural and the macabre. By approaching these happenings of the ghosts, demons and the strange, they will learn about the cultural, familial, and even political nature of Asian society. Furthermore, these Asian metaphysical and mystical mysteries tell us much about the nature of the dead and undead beings as seen from Confucian and Buddhists perspectives. Each country also brings its own native religions into play: Taoism (China), Shamanism (Korea), and Shintoism (Japan). Students shall gain a way to better and understanding Asian society and even Western society. Questions about cultural transparency will be asked when comparisons are made with Western ghost narratives and traditions. Thus, students will learn to objectively question our own social fears, taboos, and norms when reflected against the mirror that is Eastern supernatural tales of darkness, lust, and revenge. ENG 4910 Prerequisites: Senior standing. ENG 5910 Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
ENG 5910 - Asian Ghost Tales: Film and Fiction 28212 Students will study the Asian narratives of the paranormal, the supernatural and the macabre. By approaching these happenings of the ghosts, demons and the strange, they will learn about the cultural, familial, and even political nature of Asian society. Furthermore, these Asian metaphysical and mystical mysteries tell us much about the nature of the dead and undead beings as seen from Confucian and Buddhists perspectives. Each country also brings its own native religions into play: Taoism (China), Shamanism (Korea), and Shintoism (Japan). Students shall gain a way to better and understanding Asian society and even Western society. Questions about cultural transparency will be asked when comparisons are made with Western ghost narratives and traditions. Thus, students will learn to objectively question our own social fears, taboos, and norms when reflected against the mirror that is Eastern supernatural tales of darkness, lust, and revenge. ENG 4910 Prerequisites: Senior standing. ENG 5910 Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
ENG 4910 - Samurai Film Literature 28222 The course examines the films and literature of the samurai. Students will read non-fiction, philosophy, and fiction. They will also explore samurai films and its influences into Western culture. The samurai lore will be studied from Confucian, Shinto and Buddhism viewpoints. ENG 4910 Prerequisites: Senior standing. ENG 5910 Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
ENG 5910 - Samurai Film Literature 28224 The course examines the films and literature of the samurai. Students will read non-fiction, philosophy, and fiction. They will also explore samurai films and its influences into Western culture. The samurai lore will be studied from Confucian, Shinto and Buddhism viewpoints. ENG 4910 Prerequisites: Senior standing. ENG 5910 Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
FIN 2313 - Personal Finance 28332 A survey of the field of personal financial management with major emphasis on problems of budgeting, insurance, bank services, credit usage, and investing.
FIN 3413 - Real Estate Principles 27863 Methods and practices of operating real estate agencies; conveyance of title, leases, mortgages, liens, contracts to buy or sell; methods of financing; zoning laws, subdividing, developing, agency management; appraisal practices.
FIN 3423 - Real Estate Practice 27838 Continuation of real estate principles with emphasis on practical and operational problems of the broker. Among topics covered will be listings, advertising, sales training, property valuation, property management, office management and closings. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3413.
FIN 3473 - Real Property Management 27750 Developing, executing and evaluating comprehensive plans for the management of various kinds of real estate including: office buildings, industrial properties, hotels, store property, conventional housing; handling tenant credit and collections; dealing with maintenance problems; maintaining records and accounting.
GEO 2303 - Regional Geo Of The World 28230 A study of the world’s major regions. Each region’s physical, cultural, and politico-economic characteristics are reviewed. Region-wide cooperation patterns are discussed and compared. Most major countries in the region are introduced with emphasis on related current issues.
HIST 1483 - History Of U.S. to 1877 28235 US History to 1877 is a survey of US history from the colonial period through the Civil War.
HIST 1493 - History Of U.S. Since 1877 28355 US History since 1877 is a survey of US history from the post-bellum period to the present
MATH 1513 - College Algebra 28013 This course is an overview of algebraic topics used in real world applications. Topics include complex numbers, variation, solving equations and inequalities, properties and the algebra of functions, graphing basic functions and their transformations, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, as well as modeling and real world applications. This course also serves as a preparatory course for Bio-Calculus and Mathematical Analysis for Business. Credit may be earned in only one course from MATH 1453 or MATH 1513.
MATH 1593 - Plane Trigonometry 28075 The course content focuses on trigonometric functions, equations and identities. Students will also learn solutions of triangles and the trigonometric representation of complex numbers. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or (MATH 1533 or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1533) or appropriate placement score.
MATH 2053 - Math Analysis for Business 28033 This course explores the mechanics underlying differential and integral calculus, as well as, their applications to business. It primarily focuses on single variable functions, but it will also introduce multivariable functions. This course is designed to equip business students with the tools to solve problems involving limits, differentiation, interpretations of the derivative, antiderivatives, indefinite and definite integrals, and partial differentiation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1453 or MATH 1513 or MATH 1533 or High School Algebra II all with a minimum grade of “C” or appropriate placement score.
SOC 3203 - Minorities in American Society 28283 Minorities in American Society provides an understand the concept of minority group and minority group behavior; the extent of the sociocultural reasons for prejudice and discrimination; and contemporary dominant-minority group relations in the United States. Prerequisite(s): SOC 2103 and junior standing or above.
SOC 3403 - The Family 28287 A history of the family as a social and educational institution; problems confronting the modern family. Prerequisite(s): SOC 2103 or FMCD 2223 and sophomore standing or above.
SOC 4443 - Social Stratification 28291 Social Stratification will explore theories of class and caste, wealth, status, and power, and the American class system. Prerequisite(s): ENG 1113, 1213, and SOC 2103 with junior standing or above.
STAT 2103 - Intro Statistics for Sciences 27827 This course is an introduction to statistical methods with an emphasis on scientific applications. Students will be exposed to descriptive statistics, probability, estimation methods, hypothesis testing, linear regression, and correlation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or high school Algebra II with a minimum grade of “C”.

Summer 2018 - SPOC Block 1



Enrollment Start Date 5/7/2018
Enrollment End Date 6/29/2018
Refund Deadline 5/13/2018
Withdrawal Deadline 6/14/2018


BIO 1114 - General Biology 32415 This is an introduction to the life sciences as a course to fulfill the general education requirement for non-biology majors. The topics include an introduction to the fundamental principles of biology, the scientific method, cell structure and organization, biological molecules and metabolism, the levels of biological organization and systematics, plant and animal systems, Mendelian genetics, heredity, evolution and ecology. This course does not have an accompanying laboratory session and does not count towards a B.S. degree in Biology. A student will not receive credit for having taken both BIO 1114 and BIO 1214.
CJ 1313 - Writing for CJ Professionals 32481 Writing for Criminal Justice Professionals focuses on the unique types of writing required in the criminal justice field, including but not limited to research papers, investigative and prosecutorial reports, press 301 University of Central Oklahoma Undergraduate Catalog 2017-2018 releases, search warrants, and probation reports. Emphasis will be placed on clear and effective writing. As part of the learning process, students will critique the writing of others. Students will learn and be able to demonstrate their ability to use the American Psychological Association (APA) citation style. Prerequisite(s): Enrollment open to Criminal Justice majors only.
FIN 2313 - Personal Finance 32416 A survey of the field of personal financial management with major emphasis on problems of budgeting, insurance, bank services, credit usage, and investing.
FIN 3413 - Real Estate Principles 32417 Methods and practices of operating real estate agencies; conveyance of title, leases, mortgages, liens, contracts to buy or sell; methods of financing; zoning laws, subdividing, developing, agency management; appraisal practices.
FIN 3423 - Real Estate Practice 32418 Continuation of real estate principles with emphasis on practical and operational problems of the broker. Among topics covered will be listings, advertising, sales training, property valuation, property management, office management and closings. Prerequisite(s): FIN 3413.
FIN 3473 - Real Property Management 32379 Developing, executing and evaluating comprehensive plans for the management of various kinds of real estate including: office buildings, industrial properties, hotels, store property, conventional housing; handling tenant credit and collections; dealing with maintenance problems; maintaining records and accounting.
MATH 1513 - College Algebra 32419 This course is an overview of algebraic topics used in real world applications. Topics include complex numbers, variation, solving equations and inequalities, properties and the algebra of functions, graphing basic functions and their transformations, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, as well as modeling and real world applications. This course also serves as a preparatory course for Bio-Calculus and Mathematical Analysis for Business. Credit may be earned in only one course from MATH 1453 or MATH 1513.
MATH 1593 - Plane Trigonometry 32425 The course content focuses on trigonometric functions, equations and identities. Students will also learn solutions of triangles and the trigonometric representation of complex numbers. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or (MATH 1533 or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1533) or appropriate placement score.
MATH 2053 - Math Analysis for Business 32429 This course explores the mechanics underlying differential and integral calculus, as well as, their applications to business. It primarily focuses on single variable functions, but it will also introduce multivariable functions. This course is designed to equip business students with the tools to solve problems involving limits, differentiation, interpretations of the derivative, antiderivatives, indefinite and definite integrals, and partial differentiation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1453 or MATH 1513 or MATH 1533 or High School Algebra II all with a minimum grade of “C” or appropriate placement score.
STAT 2103 - Intro Statistics for Sciences 32433 This course is an introduction to statistical methods with an emphasis on scientific applications. Students will be exposed to descriptive statistics, probability, estimation methods, hypothesis testing, linear regression, and correlation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or high school Algebra II with a minimum grade of “C”.

Summer 2018 - SPOC Block 2



Enrollment Start Date 5/21/2018
Enrollment End Date 7/13/2018
Refund Deadline 5/27/2018
Withdrawal Deadline 6/28/2018


BIO 1114 - General Biology 32478 This is an introduction to the life sciences as a course to fulfill the general education requirement for non-biology majors. The topics include an introduction to the fundamental principles of biology, the scientific method, cell structure and organization, biological molecules and metabolism, the levels of biological organization and systematics, plant and animal systems, Mendelian genetics, heredity, evolution and ecology. This course does not have an accompanying laboratory session and does not count towards a B.S. degree in Biology. A student will not receive credit for having taken both BIO 1114 and BIO 1214.
CJ 1313 - Writing for CJ Professionals 32482 Writing for Criminal Justice Professionals focuses on the unique types of writing required in the criminal justice field, including but not limited to research papers, investigative and prosecutorial reports, press 301 University of Central Oklahoma Undergraduate Catalog 2017-2018 releases, search warrants, and probation reports. Emphasis will be placed on clear and effective writing. As part of the learning process, students will critique the writing of others. Students will learn and be able to demonstrate their ability to use the American Psychological Association (APA) citation style. Prerequisite(s): Enrollment open to Criminal Justice majors only.
FIN 3413 - Real Estate Principles 32457 Methods and practices of operating real estate agencies; conveyance of title, leases, mortgages, liens, contracts to buy or sell; methods of financing; zoning laws, subdividing, developing, agency management; appraisal practices.
MATH 1513 - College Algebra 32420 This course is an overview of algebraic topics used in real world applications. Topics include complex numbers, variation, solving equations and inequalities, properties and the algebra of functions, graphing basic functions and their transformations, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, as well as modeling and real world applications. This course also serves as a preparatory course for Bio-Calculus and Mathematical Analysis for Business. Credit may be earned in only one course from MATH 1453 or MATH 1513.
MATH 1593 - Plane Trigonometry 32426 The course content focuses on trigonometric functions, equations and identities. Students will also learn solutions of triangles and the trigonometric representation of complex numbers. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or (MATH 1533 or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1533) or appropriate placement score.
MATH 2053 - Math Analysis for Business 32430 This course explores the mechanics underlying differential and integral calculus, as well as, their applications to business. It primarily focuses on single variable functions, but it will also introduce multivariable functions. This course is designed to equip business students with the tools to solve problems involving limits, differentiation, interpretations of the derivative, antiderivatives, indefinite and definite integrals, and partial differentiation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1453 or MATH 1513 or MATH 1533 or High School Algebra II all with a minimum grade of “C” or appropriate placement score.
STAT 2103 - Intro Statistics for Sciences 32434 This course is an introduction to statistical methods with an emphasis on scientific applications. Students will be exposed to descriptive statistics, probability, estimation methods, hypothesis testing, linear regression, and correlation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or high school Algebra II with a minimum grade of “C”.

Summer 2018 - SPOC Block 3



Enrollment Start Date 6/4/2018
Enrollment End Date 7/27/2018
Refund Deadline 6/22/2018
Withdrawal Deadline 7/16/2018


BIO 1114 - General Biology 32479 This is an introduction to the life sciences as a course to fulfill the general education requirement for non-biology majors. The topics include an introduction to the fundamental principles of biology, the scientific method, cell structure and organization, biological molecules and metabolism, the levels of biological organization and systematics, plant and animal systems, Mendelian genetics, heredity, evolution and ecology. This course does not have an accompanying laboratory session and does not count towards a B.S. degree in Biology. A student will not receive credit for having taken both BIO 1114 and BIO 1214.
CJ 1313 - Writing for CJ Professionals 32483 Writing for Criminal Justice Professionals focuses on the unique types of writing required in the criminal justice field, including but not limited to research papers, investigative and prosecutorial reports, press 301 University of Central Oklahoma Undergraduate Catalog 2017-2018 releases, search warrants, and probation reports. Emphasis will be placed on clear and effective writing. As part of the learning process, students will critique the writing of others. Students will learn and be able to demonstrate their ability to use the American Psychological Association (APA) citation style. Prerequisite(s): Enrollment open to Criminal Justice majors only.
FIN 3473 - Real Property Management 32380 Developing, executing and evaluating comprehensive plans for the management of various kinds of real estate including: office buildings, industrial properties, hotels, store property, conventional housing; handling tenant credit and collections; dealing with maintenance problems; maintaining records and accounting.
MATH 1513 - College Algebra 32423 This course is an overview of algebraic topics used in real world applications. Topics include complex numbers, variation, solving equations and inequalities, properties and the algebra of functions, graphing basic functions and their transformations, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, as well as modeling and real world applications. This course also serves as a preparatory course for Bio-Calculus and Mathematical Analysis for Business. Credit may be earned in only one course from MATH 1453 or MATH 1513.
MATH 1593 - Plane Trigonometry 32427 The course content focuses on trigonometric functions, equations and identities. Students will also learn solutions of triangles and the trigonometric representation of complex numbers. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or (MATH 1533 or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1533) or appropriate placement score.
MATH 2053 - Math Analysis for Business 32431 This course explores the mechanics underlying differential and integral calculus, as well as, their applications to business. It primarily focuses on single variable functions, but it will also introduce multivariable functions. This course is designed to equip business students with the tools to solve problems involving limits, differentiation, interpretations of the derivative, antiderivatives, indefinite and definite integrals, and partial differentiation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1453 or MATH 1513 or MATH 1533 or High School Algebra II all with a minimum grade of “C” or appropriate placement score.
STAT 2103 - Intro Statistics for Sciences 32435 This course is an introduction to statistical methods with an emphasis on scientific applications. Students will be exposed to descriptive statistics, probability, estimation methods, hypothesis testing, linear regression, and correlation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or high school Algebra II with a minimum grade of “C”.

Summer 2018 - SPOC Block 4



Enrollment Start Date 6/18/2018
Enrollment End Date 7/27/2018
Refund Deadline 6/22/2018
Withdrawal Deadline 7/16/2018


BIO 1114 - General Biology 32480 This is an introduction to the life sciences as a course to fulfill the general education requirement for non-biology majors. The topics include an introduction to the fundamental principles of biology, the scientific method, cell structure and organization, biological molecules and metabolism, the levels of biological organization and systematics, plant and animal systems, Mendelian genetics, heredity, evolution and ecology. This course does not have an accompanying laboratory session and does not count towards a B.S. degree in Biology. A student will not receive credit for having taken both BIO 1114 and BIO 1214.
CJ 1313 - Writing for CJ Professionals 32484 Writing for Criminal Justice Professionals focuses on the unique types of writing required in the criminal justice field, including but not limited to research papers, investigative and prosecutorial reports, press 301 University of Central Oklahoma Undergraduate Catalog 2017-2018 releases, search warrants, and probation reports. Emphasis will be placed on clear and effective writing. As part of the learning process, students will critique the writing of others. Students will learn and be able to demonstrate their ability to use the American Psychological Association (APA) citation style. Prerequisite(s): Enrollment open to Criminal Justice majors only.
FIN 3413 - Real Estate Principles 32458 Methods and practices of operating real estate agencies; conveyance of title, leases, mortgages, liens, contracts to buy or sell; methods of financing; zoning laws, subdividing, developing, agency management; appraisal practices.
MATH 1513 - College Algebra 32424 This course is an overview of algebraic topics used in real world applications. Topics include complex numbers, variation, solving equations and inequalities, properties and the algebra of functions, graphing basic functions and their transformations, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, as well as modeling and real world applications. This course also serves as a preparatory course for Bio-Calculus and Mathematical Analysis for Business. Credit may be earned in only one course from MATH 1453 or MATH 1513.
MATH 1593 - Plane Trigonometry 32428 The course content focuses on trigonometric functions, equations and identities. Students will also learn solutions of triangles and the trigonometric representation of complex numbers. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1513 with a minimum grade of “C” or (MATH 1533 or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1533) or appropriate placement score.
MATH 2053 - Math Analysis for Business 32432 This course explores the mechanics underlying differential and integral calculus, as well as, their applications to business. It primarily focuses on single variable functions, but it will also introduce multivariable functions. This course is designed to equip business students with the tools to solve problems involving limits, differentiation, interpretations of the derivative, antiderivatives, indefinite and definite integrals, and partial differentiation. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1453 or MATH 1513 or MATH 1533 or High School Algebra II all with a minimum grade of “C” or appropriate placement score.






Questions?


For questions concerning the Self-Paced Online Courses, please contact Glenda Todd at gtodd@uco.edu or (405) 974-2921.